Liberated Lens current members

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  • Elizabeth Ray has a BFA in film from the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, with an emphasis on editing and post production (graduated 2011). She has also worked on many short films, music videos, and promotional pieces as an assistant director, and was a member of the Scary Cow Film Collective (in San Franicisco) before becoming involved with Liberated Lens. Now she seeks to share her highly specialized, overpriced education with passionate people who can’t afford the same price tag (and, she believes, shouldn’t have to).
  • Anna Karewicz started working on social documentaries with Video Chamba, a grassroots collective in Chicago that created documentaries about important social issues in collaboration with Chicago Access Network TV. Video Chamba also conducted trainings within the local activist community and taught immigrants how to use video equipment to produce documentaries that show the present times through their perspective.
  • Dennis Terry has 20 years experience working on cooperatives in the Bay Area. He worked at Bookpeople, Nabalom bakery and was a founding member of Mandela Foods Cooperative in Oakland. Since 1997 he has been the volunteer and member of NOBAWC (The Network of Bay Area Worker Cooperatives. He has also been a volunteer with the Freedom farmers Market in Oakland since 2013.
  • Gerald Sanders has over 40 years of experience in the Civil Rights, Black Power, and workers movements. In 1989 he became one of the co-founders of Berkeley Copwatch. In their struggle for police accountability they started filming their patrols with VHS video cameras. Eventually they made a film entitled "These Streets Are Watching". He am presently on the Nominating and Education Committee of his credit union, the Coop Credit Union. He is also currently a volunteer with Food Not Bombs.
  • André Little is an artist, cultural activist, performer, opportunity creator, and Bay Area native. He joined Liberated Lens to offer his past experience as a public school educator and youth social worker. His interest in filmmaking is to build a bridge between the social, cultural, and digital divides.
  • Jabari Jones is just getting started on a career in film, and is currently applying to a film school in San Francisco and one in Germany to learn cinematography. Working with Liberated Lens has taught him the vital aspects of making documentaries and inspired him to further his education.
  • Stephen Graves was born in New York City and grew up in St. Petersburg, Florida. He directed, filmed, and edited the feature experimental documentary A Body without Organs (2012), which won the Most Visionary Film Award at the 2013 Chicago Underground Film Festival and went on to screen at festivals internationally. He has since completed a second long form documentary, Privilege and Obsession (2015), which he is now in the process of re-making.
  • Sarah Bierman is a self-taught screenwriter, playwright, and cook. She has been a queer feminist activist since she was 15. She has taught screenwriting classes for Liberated Lens and plans to give online classes remotely, from her new home in Vietnam.
  • Tyler Burdenski is a film and multi-media artist who has worked professionally and personally in media production for over 10 years. Film works focus on themes of justice in education, finding reality in the absurd, and finding the absurd in reality. He has been passionate about and involved with media literacy education since 2007. More info at Muddled Media
  • Bunker Seyfert is a documentary cinematographer who has been focusing on the climate change movement for over five years. His film career began in Philadelphia working with a range of local organizations, including one short featured on the National Geographic channel. After moving to New York, he started working for 350.org, GreenPeace, and a number of documentary production companies and environmental organizations. His latest feature film, Nicotine Bees, was distributed by the Sierra Club to each member of Congress in an effort to uncover the mystery behind recent massive honey bee die-offs.